Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

   

What is SavvyAnalysis.com?

SavvyAnalysis.com is the world's most powerful platform for analyzing piston aircraft engine monitor data. It supports all popular engine monitors. The platform allows you to view engine monitor data in graphical form and to analyze the data using a powerful set of tools. There is no charge for you to use the platform and all of its tools and features. It's absolutely FREE

What is SavvyAnalysis Pro?

SavvyAnalysis Pro is an on-line service providing professional analysis of your engine monitor data. Our analysts use the SavvyAnalysis.com platform in performing the analysis. Give us the data...we do the analysis for you.

What is a digital engine monitor?

A digital engine monitor is a device installed in many piston engine aircraft which records critical parameters of combustion in real time. Almost all digital engine monitors will record exhaust gas temperature and cylinder head temperature for each individual cylinder. More sophisticated monitors also record other engine parameters such as manifold pressure and fuel flow, and electrical and air data such as bus voltage and aircraft altitude. The data is stored in the device, can be downloaded to a computer, then uploaded to SavvyAnalysis.com for archiving, viewing and analysis.

What is FEVA™?

Failing Exhaust Valve Analytics (FEVA™) is a new service included in every SavvyAnalysis Pro and SavvyMx subscription at no additional cost. FEVA™ automatically scans each flight you upload to the SavvyAnalysis platform looking for the telltale signature of a failing exhaust valve. If it detects one, you will receive an alert by email. Find more information about FEVA™ here. (FEVA™ is not available to clients using SavvyAnalysis for free. SavvyAnalysis Free clients can obtain FEVA™ service by upgrading to the SavvyAnalysis Pro or SavvyMx subscription services.) 

What are the benefits of having a professional analyst interpret my digital engine monitor data?

The benefits include better and less expensive maintenance of your engine, more efficient operation, and improved reliability. Here's why: Digital engine monitors provide the only way to actually see what is happening during the engine's combustion process, measuring and recording information about the health of the fuel, ignition, induction, exhaust and turbocharging systems. The information is invaluable in diagnosing both mechanical problems and problems with operating technique.

For instance, the impending failure of an exhaust valve shows a distinctive signature in engine monitor data. Ignition system problems visible in the data include marginal spark plugs and mistimed magnetos. Fuel system problems include mismatched or contaminated injectors and improperly adjusted fuel flows. Induction leaks are another problem that can be identified. It is also possible to identify failures in the digital engine monitor system itself, including failing temperature probes and poor wiring connections.

Identifying these problems before the aircraft goes into the shop has many benefits. Many engine-related problems can only be diagnosed while the engine is operating. Once it is in the shop, the opportunity for troubleshooting is gone. Even when diagnosis is possible by physical inspection of the engine, it is always much better to avoid “exploratory surgery” involving disassembly of engine components, especially cylinders. Exploratory surgery has two serious disadvantages: it is costly, and it can result in failures which are a result of the maintenance itself. These failures are common enough to have their own acronym: MIFs (maintenance induced failures).

We also find that many engine anomalies experienced by pilots result from misunderstandings about correct operating procedure. The engine monitor data can be invaluable in uncovering these problems and helping the pilot correct his powerplant management technique.

Learn more about your engine's operation and the theory and benefits of engine monitor data analysis by reading Mike Busch's educational articles.


Can you give me an example?

Here is an example of an actual report prepared by one of our analysts.

What engine monitor models are supported?

Virtually all of them, both certified and experimental. In the rare event we come across one that we do not support, we make it our first priority to add support. Here is a list of monitors we currently support:


How much does SavvyAnalysis Pro cost and where can I sign up?

SavvyAnalysis Pro is available in two purchase options, annual Pro service and Pro Packs.

SavvyAnalysis Pro  - Designed for aircraft owners for use on a single aircraft, the service is priced $129/year for singles, $199/year for twins, and includes analysis of as many diagnostically useful flights as necessary to evaluate the condition of your engine.

SavvyAnalysis Pro Pack - Designed for maintenance shops and aircraft fleets, each Shop Pack includes a fixed number of analysis reports which can be used on any aircraft engine. Requesting analysis of both engines of a twin will use up two reports. Shop Packs are priced as follows:

     5 - pack: $249
     10 - pack: $449
     20 - pack: $799

Learn More About Pro (Owners)    Learn More About Pro Packs (Shops)

I'm a SavvyMx managed-maintenance client. Do I need to sign up for SavvyAnalysis Pro?

The cost of a SavvyAnalysis Pro subscription is included in your annual maintenance management service. Your aircraft will be automatically enrolled in SavvyAnalysis Pro.

However, we ask that you make requests for analysis through the SavvyMx ticket system at http://ticket.savvymx.com/ to ensure that your account manager has access to your request and the analysis results. To do this, simply click on the "Upload Engine Data" button in the header of any SavvyMx ticket.

How does SavvyAnalysis Pro work? How do I communicate with the analyst?

After uploading your flight data to SavvyAnalysis.com you request analysis of your engine data by creating a “ticket” on our on line system. You are asked to provide any information that you think would be helpful in our analysis, such as concerns you have about your engine or anomalies you noticed during the flight. Your ticket will be assigned to one of our professional analysts, who will respond on the ticket, providing you the results in an attractive, well-organized report that you can share with your mechanic, complete with detailed analytical findings and recommendations. The ticket system was designed to be quick and easy to use, and is the sole method of communicating with the analyst. To keep our service affordable to the largest number of people we regret that we cannot communicate by phone or email. A user guide for SavvyAnalysis Pro is available.

What does an interpretation include?

The analyst will examine your engine monitor data for any indications that the engine is not operating normally. He will provide you with a report of his findings, suggesting likely causes of any noted abnormalities as a starting point for you and your mechanic to troubleshoot the problem further.

Will you analyze the data from all of my flights?

We will analyze any flight data that we believe is diagnostically useful in determining the condition of your engine and evaluating your operating technique, or solving a problem you are having. This includes test profile flights and flights during which you observe abnormal engine performance or indications. Analyzing data from all of your flights is rarely productive and would require that we charge substantially more for a subscription.

When or what kind of flights should have analyzed?

Our experience has shown that reviewing data from "day to day" flights doesn't provide much that is diagnostically meaningful. Flights completed with test profiles typically have a sufficient amount of normal ops and cruise flight included for us to comment on things like powerplant management techniques, fuel system setup, prop governor setting, engine monitor issues, etc.

We discourage submission of multiple flights for analysis at one time; the most recent flight, especially with flight test profiles, is going to be the most diagnostically useful. Analysis of such flights often makes a lot of sense before going into annual or some other instance of scheduled significant maintenance, and then again after the maintenance is complete.

Of course, if there is an anomaly/event in-flight, then submitting such a flight makes sense. Even in those cases, we encourage our clients to perform test profiles if it's possible to do so safely, as they give us the best chance to pin-point the issue.

What are "flight test profiles"?

Flight test profiles are exercises performed by the pilot in flight. They are designed to test the condition of your engine's fuel, ignition and induction systems. Flight test profiles include the mixture distribution test (sometimes called a GAMI lean test) and the ignition stress test (in-flight lean mag check). If necessary, we will also recommend an induction leak test. A detailed tutorial on performing the flight test profiles is available in the web site's "Help" and "Learn More" sections.

Will you help me troubleshoot my engine's problems?

Engine monitor data analysis can point to a surprising number of specific engine problems. The analyst will suggest likely causes of the problems he identifies, which can be very useful to you and your mechanic in troubleshooting a problem. However, the analyst's comments will be limited to what he sees in your data. It's your responsibility and your mechanic's to complete the troubleshooting and make a definitive diagnosis.

Why won't you talk to my mechanic about troubleshooting my engine's problems?

To keep our service affordable we must limit our involvement to interpreting the data. We think we can provide the most value by focusing on your engine monitor data, and suggesting likely starting points for troubleshooting any problems we see. If you prefer us to be more involved in your maintenance, consider signing up for our full maintenance management service at savvymx.com.

Can I upgrade my SavvyAnalysis Pro service to SavvyMx full maintenance management service?

Yes you can! And if you do you will receive a full refund of your SavvyAnalysis Pro fee if you upgrade to SavvyMx within 6 months of the start of you current SavvyAnalysis Pro subscription.

How do I set up unit conversions?

A detailed description is available in our User Guide. Unit conversions can be configured by selecting "My Aircraft" under the "Flight Data" tab, then selecting the "Actions" button for the aircraft you want the conversions to apply to.

Can I edit the departure and destination airport of my flights manually?

Yes, you can! You can click on the Edit Airports link found near the bottom right hand corner of the My Flights page. A more detailed description is available in our User Guide.

How do I upload data from a UBG-16?

Files that come from a UBG-16 do not contain "heading names" for each of the columns in the file (each column represents a data series, such as EGT1). As such, if you were to upload such a file to SavvyAnalysis, we would not be able to tell which column was EGT1, which was CHT1, and so on.

To work around this, you have to configure your aircraft's profile with these mappings. This will tell us, for example, that Column 1 is EGT1, column 2 is CHT2, etc.

You should be able to find these mappings in your aircraft logs at the time your UBG-16 was installed. If you do not have such entries, you may need to open the file and do some detective work. If you open the file with an editor, be very careful not to accidentally save over the original. This will almost certainly make it unusable. It is best to make a copy and open the copy.

Here are the steps to provide us with the UBG-16 configuration:

  1. Log into www.savvyanalysis.com
  2. Under "Flight Data" select "Manage Aircraft"
  3. Click on the "Actions Menu" icon for your aircraft
  4. If there is an entry "Edit UBG-16 Mappings" select it, and skip the next two steps
  5. If there is no enry "Edit UBG-16 Mappings" select the "Edit" option
  6. Set the Engine Monitor to "EI" / "UBG-16" and click "Save". Then select the "Actions Menu" again and click on "Edit UBG-16 Mappings"
  7. On the screen that follows you now have to tell us, how your columns are mapped. You can select "Typical Single" or "Typical Twin" to get most settings populated and then adjust from there.
  8. When you are done, click "Save"
  9. Select "Upload New" from the main menu, ensure you are uploading against the correct aircraft and upload your files.

Note: The mappings apply to file uploaded after the mappings have been set. In other words, if you upload a few files, and then change the mappings, the existing files are not affected or changed in any way.

How do I upload data from an MGL Avionics engine monitor?

Files that come from a MGL Avionics engine monitors do not contain "heading names" for the EGT and CHT series. As such, if you were to upload such a file to SavvyAnalysis, we would not be able to tell which column was EGT1, which was CHT1, and so on.

To work around this, you have to configure your aircraft's profile with these mappings. This will tell us, for example, that Sensor 1 is EGT1, column 2 is CHT2, etc.

You should be able to find these mappings in your aircraft logs at the time your MGL was installed. If you do not have such entries, you may need to play around with the mappings and do some detective work.

Here are the steps to provide us with the MGL configuration:

  1. Log into www.savvyanalysis.com
  2. Under "Flight Data" select "Manage Aircraft"
  3. Click on the "Actions Menu" icon for your aircraft
  4. If there is an entry "Edit MGL Mappings" select it, and skip the next two steps
  5. If there is no enry "Edit MGL Mappings" select the "Edit" option
  6. Set the Engine Monitor to "MGL", set the Model to your MGL model and click "Save". Then select the "Actions Menu" again and click on "Edit MGL Mappings"
  7. On the screen that follows you now have to tell us, how your columns are mapped. You can select "Typical 4/6 Cyl Single" or "Typical 4/6 Cyl Twin" to get most settings populated and then adjust from there.
  8. When you are done, click "Save"
  9. Select "Upload New" from the main menu, ensure you are uploading against the correct aircraft and upload your files.

Note 1: The mappings apply to file uploaded after the mappings have been set. In other words, if you upload a few files, and then change the mappings, the existing files are not affected or changed in any way.

Note 2: We only support .REC files. We do not support .EFL files. By uploading the .REC files frequently, you will likely get duplicate flights and you will have to delete those manually. Due to the MGL data format, we don't have a good way of handling this issue at present.

I have a GRT monitor that records each flight in multiple small files. Help!

We've build a new feature to help with stitching together those smaller files.  Here's how it works:

Take all the flights that make up a single flight, and zip them up together.  The files need to have the same filenames, except for the index numbering for the 2nd and subsequent files.  For example:

DEMO-0000.log
DEMO-0000+1.log
DEMO-0000+2.log
DEMO-0000+3.log

Then rename the zip and prepend the words "grt-merge", so for example, you could call it:

grt-merge-2014-08-24.zip

... and upload this file.  Our system will recognize it, and stitch all the files together.

Why do my GRT uploads show the wrong date?

If you have a GPS connected to your GRT, flight date and time should be referenced to the GPS data. If a GPS does not exist, the  GRT unit does not report the time or date, so SavvyAnalysis defaults to 2000-01-01. If you would like the date to be entered correctly for the flight, you have to name the file correctly.

If you are uploading single files and they start with this pattern:

DEMO-20161231-131500XXXX.log (where XXX is any optional text that may or may not be there) we already grab that time and date and use it as the flight start time.

If you are merging files together, you need to include the date in the name of the zip file, not the individual files.  Use either of the following formats (again XXXX is optional text that will be ignored).

grt-merge-2016-12-31XXXXXX.zip

grt-merge-2016-12-31-131500XXXXXX.zip

My Dynon files show the flight date as 2001-01-01. How do I fix this?

Dynon files downloaded with the serial interface do not include date information, so we default those to 2001-01-01.  If you would like to have the correct date for your flights, you can rename the files before you upload them to start with the date.

For example, "file001.txt" would become "2016-09-22 file001.txt".  You must use leading zeros, so 2016-9-2 is not OK, but 2016-09-02 is OK.

 

 

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